HUMOR: 'Change' as a Social Networking Website
Louis Cannon | 11/10/08
Social Networking websites
If you wish to tell Your Own Personal Story about the 2008 election, you are invited to do so at the new government website, Change.gov

Social Networking websites
If you'd rather chat about Christina Aguilera's new album, you can always stick with MySpace.com
Change has officially arrived as one of the web's social networking options, thanks to a newly launched Obama-Biden website.

During the 2008 Presidential campaign, the Obama-Biden ticket made tremendous use of the Internet — for fundraising as well as for promoting the candidates and their platform — an approach which, obviously, worked quite successfully. 

Obama swept the American youth vote — voters under the age of 30 — by a significant margin.  Those young voters supported for Obama over Republican rival John McCain by a margin of more than 2-to-1, according to exit polls.  That’s a significantly greater margin than the number of young people who prefer Coke over Pepsi.

That same under 30 age group has made social networking websites Facebook.com and MySpace.com, respectively, the fifth and the seventh most visited websites in the known universe.

And now we have an official new U.S. government website: Change.gov

The website offers a Blog, YouTube videos — and a chance for you, the Average American Internet User, to contribute your own Vision to the Change.gov website. (You can have your son or daughter help you out, if you get confused.)

On a page titled “An American Moment: Your Story” you can submit your email address and Your Own Story about the 2008 election (both are *required fields.)  You can also upload a photo, or even a video — (of your cat watching the Election Day returns on CNN, perhaps?)

“Start right now. Tell us your story in your own words about what this campaign and this election means to you. Share your hopes for an Obama Administration and a government for the people,” the submission page instructs.  I note that the submission form includes a SpellChecker function which tells me that “Obamma” is a misspelled word, but that “Obama” is spelled correctly.

Obama raised over $600 million in campaign contributions during his "change-making" run for President, and much of that money came in the form of credit card payments processed through various Obama websites.  The average contribution was $86.  That amount was well suited to the under 30 crowd, who mostly have $200 limits on their VISA cards.

Obama will be, at age 47, the fifth youngest President in U.S. history when he is inaugurated in January.  He will also be the second most handsome President — and the first President ever to use a Blackberry to check his email.  Or is it spelled with a lower case “b” as in “blackberry”?  I’ll have to use the spellchecker, I guess.
 
   

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