Of Lice, Skunks and Squirrels
Darcy Downing | 2/26/13

This is Part 3 of the incredible miracle of how my daughter survived the Bubonic Plague and how our family became vessels for an infection of Love.  Start at the beginning if you’re just now joining us. Click : Part 1 or Part 2

The summer was hot and dry like my spirit.  The Forth of July parade arrived and we decided to help the Daisy troop out on the parade float.  This was the very last thing I should have ever committed to, but I was seeing those little Daisies and the cow eyes of my own three daughters, and decided to take a day off from working on the house. 

Now, I have been very active in Girl Scouts, and I wish I could say that once you turn twenty (or even forty for that matter) that bullying between women stops– it doesn’t.  I was so exhausted from trying to do the right thing.  However, if I am honest, my exhaustion stemmed from “taking over” and always trying to fix things.  I had so many walls up around my heart that I had convinced myself those walls were catapults and that everything I launched myself into was for the good of all.

I ended up doing the float myself, with my family and one other parent and two other girls.  Now, that’s not the Girl Scout way.  Sometimes we can’t make people happy and I had to learn when to stop trying.  This realization was my introduction to a pretty tough lesson.

Earlier in the year we had committed to attend Girl Scout camp.  So, in the middle of renovations on our new home, I headed to Girl Scout camp with all three of my daughters and my Girl Scout troop.  It was awesome!  I watched in awe as my oldest daughter scampered off  and became the leader of a small band of scouts, scaling mountain sides, swinging on ropes like Tarzan’s Jane and leading the entire camp in a song or two.  My middle daughter came out of her cocoon and joined her troop in a skit and original song and Sierra was fearless.  She was the youngest scout in attendance and scaled mountain sides and embraced the zip line like an old friend.  I was proud.


Sierra, fearless on the zip-line at Girl Scout camp.  Photo courtesy of Darcy Downing

The last day of camp arrived, and my close friend and fellow camp leader transformed into a metaphorical Joshua before my very eyes.


Tiarra, my middle daughter at Girl Scout camp.  Photo courtesy of Darcy Downing

Tiarra, my middle daughter at Girl Scout camp.    Photo courtesy of Darcy Downing

    Now Joshua… was filled with the spirit of wisdom….  Deuteronomy 34:9

She took a risk and told me the truth.  She explained that I never let anyone fall or fail.  I was always stepping in rescuing everyone so that they couldn’t be held accountable.  I understood that I was trying to become everyone’s savior.  That’s not easy to admit; I was the one in the way.  My ego and I went for a walk in the woods and we cried and cried together because she was right.

Thankfully, I had a friend who was willing to tell me the truth.

    A friend loves at all times, and a brother is born for a time of adversity.  Proverbs 17:17

Thank you K.

Seeing the walls for the first time was sobering and I somehow managed to gather up the pieces of my ego and stuff them into my backpack.  The girls and I loaded up happy, smelly and tired, and a little bit wiser and stronger than before.  Little did we know we were also bringing a few new friends home with us!

Have you ever washed everything you own in one day?  I didn’t realize we had head lice until two days after we got home.  That means everything had to be washed.  It cost me $80.00 at the laundromat to wash everything.  For us, that was a fortune!  Before the laundromat we stood in the kitchen all in a line, combing, combing, combing… and crying.  I hate head lice!  My husband and I were losing patience and tension was increasing as the time was ticking away.

After the Great Washing, I decided to keep everything in trash bags.  So sleeping bags, stuffed animals and clothes we didn’t need remained in big black trash bags.  Hey!  That’s a step toward packing right?

The month ebbed away the days on the calendar and I was shocked when August arrived.  More painting and repairing.  Then one day, while at our old house, the girls came running into the house going on about a skunk.  We cautiously followed them outside to our culvert and there lay a live skunk.  Either the skunk had rabies or had been hit by a car.  My husband became very sad because it looked like a skunk that had been coming by to say hi in the evenings as he played his guitar on the back porch.  I think as we get older our hearts get softer about certain things.

The skunk was taken care of and our safari of animal exposures continued.

At the new house a week or so later, the girls decided to clean out the chicken coup.  They were making the place clean so they could hatch an egg a neighbor gave the girls.  They placed the eggs in drawers and covered them with a surrogate mother; a stuffed owl! In our frazzled state, I didn’t even think about the possibility of mouse droppings being present or junta virus.

Finally, after working a week straight, we decided to take a Sunday off.  We loaded up the girls and decided to go to our favorite campground for a picnic.  On our way to Williams Creek Reservoir, my husband pulled over just off of a forest service road.  We all piled out of the truck wondering what he was up to.

     I am the Lord your God, who brought you out of Egypt to give you the land of Canaan and to be your God.  Leviticus 25:38


Cimarrona Campground at William’s Creek Reservoir   Photo courtesy of Darcy Downing

    “Everyone needs to find a stone to carry up the trail.  I will tell you why once we get there,” he said.

We all found our stone while our middle daughter chose a tiny pebble.  My husband challenged her by commenting, “Maybe the weight of your stone will matter when we get there.  It is easier to carry a small pebble,yes,  but what if it’s worth it to invest your energy and strength toward something greater?”  I watched her think about what he said and exchange her pebble for a stone a little larger than her hand.  We followed him up the trail in the August heat.  When we got to the top, a beautiful little valley greeted us.  We set our stones down at our feet and listened as my husband explained why we were there.

“Seven years ago this summer, God brought me to this very spot,” he said pointing.

“He told me, ‘I will give you the land.’  And He has!  God has given us our little farm with a chicken coup and goat pin and even a well,” he smiled with a twinkle in his eye.

“God promised another man land once,” he explained.  ”His name was Joshua.  Joshua had to take a large group of people with him and cross the Jordan River.  Once they crossed the river, Joshua had twelve men from each tribe in the group find a stone a lot like the one you have now.  He had them place the stones into a pile as an alter of remembrance.  This alter is to honor God for His promises and to make sure we never forget what He has done for us.”

     …’Go over before the ark of the Lord your God into the middle of the Jordan.  Each of you is to take up a stone on his shoulder, according to the number of the tribes of the Israelites, to serve as a sign among you. In the future, when your children ask you, ‘What do these stones mean?’ tell them that the flow of the Jordan was cut off before the ark of the covenant of the Lord. When it crossed the Jordan, the waters of the Jordan were cut off. These stones are to be a memorial to the people of Israel forever.’

     So the Israelites did as Joshua commanded them… Joshua set up the twelve stones that had been in the middle of the Jordan at the spot where the priests who carried the ark of the covenant had stood. And they are there to this day.  The prophet Joshua 4: 4-9


My husband prayed and we thanked God as we each set our stones in a pile, our very own little altar of remembrance, and they are there to this day.


Darcy at Cimarrona Campground at William’s Creek Reservoir.  Photo courtesy of Darcy Downing

That was the same day that Sierra was bitten by the fleas that carried the bubonic plague.

Walk with me, and lets look at God’s loving kindnesses together.  He never left me or my daughter… He has never left you either….

Part 4 is on the way if I can find the keyboard through these tears!
 

 
   

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